Natalie Williams Breast Care Foundation

Dr. Terry Mason, Chief Operating Officer over all the Cook County Health Systems.

Dr. Terry Mason, Chief Operating Officer at Cook County Department of Public Health and host of “A Doctor in the House” every Sunday morning at 10 a.m. on radio station WVON 1690 AM.
Natalie Williams Breast Care Foundation

Dr. Terry Mason, Chief Operating Officer over all the Cook County Health Systems will speak about the cause & cure of all of our diseases with a focus on historical accounts of African Americans’ early existence in this country and why we are where we are now.

You will not want to miss the stunning revelations that Dr. Mason will share.

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Where:
Jesse White Center
412 W. Chicago Ave

Chicago, IL

Schedule:

9:00 AM Registration & Breakfast

10:00 AM Training

1:00 PM Keynote
Dr. Terry Mason, COO
The Cook County Health System

 

 

Diabetes has afflicted Blacks for a long time. There are two types of diabetes. Type I is when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin and patients have to take daily insulin shots. That is one that is usually diagnosed in people as a child, according to Dr. David Zich, who practices Internal Medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. He said Type I diabetes can be controlled with modern medicines and people can live long, healthy and productive lives. Zich says Type I diabetes can also be hereditary and is influenced by other environmental factors as well. Doctors say Type 2 is the most common disease that’s caused by an unhealthy lifestyle.

Terry Mason
Terry Mason

“It’s what we’re eating,” says Dr. Terry Mason, Chief Operating Officer at Cook County Department of Public Health and host of “A Doctor in the House” every Sunday morning at 10 a.m. on radio station WVON 1690 AM.

“We’re eating more meals that are produced outside of our home. We’re eating a ton of processed foods. Diabetes as well as cancers and heart disease can be lessened by doing a simple thing; drinking more water and eating more natural green foods like fruits and vegetables.”

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, there are four (4) times as many Blacks diagnosed with diabetes today as there were in 1968. And for every 6 white Americans who have diabetes, 10 Blacks have the disease. Among Blacks 20 years and older, the prevalence of diabetes is 8.2 percent compared with 4.8 percent among non-Latino whites.

Today over 2.2 million Blacks have diabetes; 1.5 million have been diagnosed and 730,000 have not yet been diagnosed, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

In 1995, there were 27,258 new cases of kidney failure attributed to diabetes in Black Americans. Blacks are much more likely to undergo a lower-extremity amputation than white or Latinos with diabetes. In 1994, there were 13,000 amputations among Black people with diabetes, involving 155,000 days in the hospital.

According to the World Health Organization Global Diabetes report, in 1980, 108 million adults had diabetes. By 2014, that number jumped to 422 million. Researches also found that diabetes killed 1.5 million people in 2012 and 2.2 million died from high blood-glucose, a complication of diabetes.

Death rates for people with diabetes are 27 percent higher for Blacks compared with whites. Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death for those ages 45 years or older.

Mason said the average American now eats up to 110 pounds of sugar every year, compared to about 12 pounds back in the 1970’s. He said the changes in diet are also leading to obesity and diabetes being found in children as young as 12. Mason lack of exercise, or laziness are also leading factors in contracting Type II diabetes.

“We also have to get out and move more. You don’t have to go out and lift up a gym, but we have a great city with a beautiful lakefront and plenty of walking, jogging and biking paths,” Dr. Mason said. “As long as we stay away from doing that and make excuses for not doing that, we will continue to see the death rate, diseases and sickness.”

Dr. Mason said he stopped eating meat over 20 years ago and said using fresh ingredients like beans, rice, okra, greens and egg plant that have protective elements in meals, can reverse the effects of Type II diabetes for those that have it and prevent it in most cases. Mason says most people are not eating enough fruits and vegetables or drinking water because they are not having enough bowel movements during the week. He said oils from fried foods are also contributing to many health problems.

 

For more information or to RSVP your attendance, call Kenyatta Fisher at 309-740-4430.   

 

Natalie Williams Breast Care Foundation
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