The Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center Mother’s Day Celebration

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ABOUT BHERC

The Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center, a nonprofit, public benefit organization, is designed to advocate, educate, research, develop, and preserve the history, and the future, of blacks in the film and television industries.

In 1996, the Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center was founded by Sandra Evers-Manly to remove the veil of invisibility that shrouds African Americans and other diverse groups from the main stage, and to spotlight diversity and the stellar contributions of black film and television artists who brought dignity and professionalism to even the most menial of roles.

The BHERC strives to highlight the important roles that blacks have played, and continue to play, in film and television. To that end, the BHERC annually celebrates and promotes black history and culture through a series of annual film festivals. The festivals showcase the richness and power of young filmmakers who will lead the struggle for positive and quality black films in the new Millennium.

BHERC MISSION

In 1996, the Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center was founded to remove the veil of invisibility that shrouds African Americans and other minority groups from the main stage, and to spotlight diversity and the stellar contributions of black film and television artists who brought dignity and professionalism to even the most menial of roles.

The Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center, a nonprofit, public benefit organization, is designed to advocate, educate, research, develop, and preserve the history, and the future, of blacks in the film and television industries.

The BHERC strives to highlight the important roles that blacks have played, and continue to play, in film and television. To that end, the BHERC annually celebrates and promotes black history and culture through a series of annual film. The festivals showcase the richness and power of young filmmakers who will lead the struggle for positive and quality black films in the new Millennium.

The Center’s commitment to the development of future filmmakers – performers, directors, and behind-the-scenes technicians and workers – is realized not only through film festivals but also through innovative educational programs. The Center annually sponsors Artistry in Motion, a seminar led by industry professionals who introduce middle and high school students to the magical world of animation, and workshops that offer inside information about the film and television industries. Since its founding, the Center’s scholarship projects have awarded more than $500,000 in equipment, in-kind services and resources to deserving film students and independent filmmakers.

With the understanding that the box office is critical in determining the fate of new films, the Center founded the First Weekend Club, in March 1997, as a financial advocate for films by and featuring the talents of African-American men and women – in front of and behind the cameras. The First Weekend Club boasts more than 35,000 members nationwide.

First Weekend Club members pledge to support movies by and featuring blacks in prominent roles on the first weekend of release, and promise to encourage 10 other filmgoers to do the same. “We don’t say ‘you’re watching the wrong movie,’” says Sandra Evers-Manly, BHERC founder/president. “Instead, we advocate broadening the types of movies people go to see. We need to develop a better understanding about the images that influence opinions about African Americans and other people of color, worldwide.”

Our mailing address is:

Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center
1875 Century Park E Ste 600
Los Angeles, CA 90067-2507

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